Bega Kwa Bega Charity Improves Water Access in Rural Uganda

Peter Gregor MD
Peter Gregor MD

For more than 40 years, Peter Gregor, MD, has practiced cardiology in various parts of the United States. A philanthropist, Peter Gregor, MD, supports the work of Bega Kwa Bega (BKB), a charity based in Uganda.

BKB works with vulnerable children in remote areas of Uganda, helping them achieve better lives by broadening their access to education, health care, and clean water. With regard to clean water, BKB works with local communities to identify springs that are used by the local families. Many times these springs are exposed, causing water contamination by animals and humans. BKB mobilizes resources and deploys locals to build protective structures around the springs to keep the water from becoming contaminated.

Where there are no springs, BKB’s strategy involves boreholes. The organization is drilling boreholes in remote areas of Uganda to improve water access for thousands of residents. BKB is also donating water tanks that are used to collect and store rainwater.

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Common Types of Congenital Heart Disease

Congenital Heart Disease pic
Congenital Heart Disease
Image: webmd.com

For more than 40 years, Peter Gregor, MD, has practiced cardiology in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Working in Owensboro, Kentucky, he performs stress tests, echocardiograms, and other non-invasive diagnostic tests and treatments. Over the course of his career, Peter Gregor, MD, has developed a professional interest in adult congenital heart disease (CHD).

Below are several common types of CHDs:

Atrial septal defect. This defect is caused by the under-development of the septum, or the wall that separates the heart’s upper chambers. Rather than flowing like normal (into the left ventricle from the left atrium), blood moves from the left atrium to the right atrium through a hole in the septum. Depending on the size of the hole, an atrial septal defect may go undetected until adulthood and could be of varying seriousness.

Pulmonary stenosis. Associated with heart failure and arrhythmias, pulmonary stenosis results from a narrow pulmonary valve or narrow area near the pulmonary valve. Because of this defect, people experience reduced blood flow to the lungs.

Ventricular septal defect. In many situations, the hole located between the lower heart chambers, or ventricles, closes on its own during childhood. However, in cases where this fails to occur, rapid heart rate and shortness of breath may result. When left alone, ventricular septal defects can result in an enlarged heart on one side.

U.S. Statistics on Congenital Heart Disease

 

Congenital Heart Disease pic
Congenital Heart Disease
Image: webmd.com

Dedicated cardiologist Peter Gregor, MD, has been practicing medicine for more than four decades. Throughout that time, Peter Gregor, MD, has focused much of his practice on diagnosing, treating, and managing various cardiology problems, including congenital heart disease (CHD).

In the United States, about 1 percent of, or 40,000, babies are born with CHDs. This makes heart defects the most common type of birth defect in the country, and the number of children diagnosed with CHD is about the same as the number of children diagnosed with autism. Of the babies with a CHD, about one-fourth have a critical defect that requires surgery or a different procedure within the first year of their life.

As medicine has continued to advance, the number of children with CHDs who survive into adulthood has been steadily growing. In fact, studies have found that the population of people with CHD who are over the age of 20 is growing by about 5 percent annually, and there are now more people who fall into this category than there are people who are below 20 and have CHD.

Although there is no system in the U.S. that tracks CHDs past childhood, many estimates believe roughly 1.4 million adults in the country are living with CHDs.

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